Who will win the 2022 World Cup?

It is anybody’s guess who will win the 2022 World Cup in Qatar come November and December.

There are, of course, favorites to win the tournament. Out of Europe, France, Germany and England are always among the favorites. Also, Spain and Portugal always have strong sides. Cristiano Ronaldo is playing in perhaps his last World Cup with Portugal. Expect a big tournament out of the Manchester United star.

Same goes for Lionel Messi in Argentina. The little maestro has Argentina humming after winning the nation’s first international trophy since the days of Diego Maradona. La Abiceleste, as well as the other finalists in the 2021 Copa America, Brazil, are the best bets to come out of South America. In fact, the two countries pose perhaps South America’s best chance to win a World Cup since Brazil won in 2002. Although, the 2014 World Cup in Brazil seemed destined for a South American side.

Part of the beauty of the World Cup, however, is the Cinderella runs of smaller soccer nations. Back in 2018, that was clearly Croatia. A nation with a comparable population to Oklahoma defeated England and Argentina before losing to France. In 2014, James Rodriguez inspired Colombia to the quarterfinals, losing to a heavily favored Brazil. Same applies to 2010 with Ghana, which had the backing of a continent before heartbreak in the quarterfinals against Uruguay.

In 2022, that could be a resurgent Denmark, Sadio Mané and Senegal or a young United States squad.

Who will win the 2022 World Cup?

We want to know your predictions for the world’s biggest sporting event. In the comments section below, share YOUR thoughts on the favorite to win and a potential dark horse team to follow in the World Cup.

For those that are curious, Brazil tops the betting odds in June before the World Cup. England, France and Spain follow the Brazilians before Argentina rounds out the top five.

The last time a betting favorite won the World Cup was back in 2010 with Spain. Brazil and Germany were the favorites to win in 2014 and 2018, respectively, and neither reached the final that year. Perhaps a bad omen for Brazil and England?

PHOTO: YUKI IWAMURA/AFP via Getty Images